The Green Food Bag Experiment

 

green-bags-afDo those green produce bags really work? You know the ones – they’re sold  at the grocery store or on-line, green plastic bags made to help reduce the release of ethylene gas from ripening fruits that can lead to rot in produce stored together. I like them, I think they keep my produce fresher, longer, and I wash them and reuse them until they develop holes, and have gotten as long as a year of use per bag. I have purchased both of the main brands available: Debbie Meyer Green Bags (20 Pack) and Evert-Fresh Bag Set. I have used both brands for years and can’t tell a difference between them.

I recently ran across a series of on-line reviews of these bags that were all over the map. Some people like me had great success with them, and some denounce them as a total fraud and waste of money. I decided to be scientific about it and try an experiment of my own. I don’t usually store bananas in the bags, generally all of my green leafy stuff goes in them, along with celery and other root veggies. But in the interest of science, I took two freshly purchased bananas in identical states and put one in the bag and left one out on the counter. Here is they are at Day 2:

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 2 side 2

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 2

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a few days, it became apparent that the banana in the bag was doing better.  Here they are at Day 8:

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 8

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 8

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 8 side 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

I haven’t decided how long I’m going to let the experiment go on.  The banana on the counter is definitely decaying faster than the one in the bag.  It is still ok for a smoothie, or a peanut butter and banana sandwich, or for quickbread.  I don’t think I’m willing to let it get to the point of drawing fruit flies and would really rather eat it, but I’ll be sure to get a picture on its last day.  Suffice it to say, I’m sticking with my green produce bags, and feel they are an important tool to keeping the fresh, local, organic produce I buy in great shape so that I can enjoy all of it.

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 12

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 12

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 12, side 2

Green Bag Banana Test, Day 12, side 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.S.  I ate the counter top banana after taking the picture on Day 12.  It was delicious as part of a peanut butter and banana sandwich on gluten free bread.  The one in the bag was nice and firm several days later, and I ate it in a bowl of puffed millet cereal on Day 15.

 

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